My current earworm:

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Welcome to America. Here’s an Ice Cream Sandwich.

America’s comfortable connotation of ice cream goes back to its founding. George Washington spent about $200 on ice cream in a single summer—more than $5,000 in today’s dollar—and Thomas Jefferson studied ice cream production in France before returning to Monticello with a sorbetière, four ice-cream molds, and a handwritten recipe for vanilla ice cream that’s still archived in the Library of Congress. Immigrants to Ellis Island were traditionally fed ice cream as part of their first American meal—a gesture ordered by the island’s commissioner and preserved in a headline from the summer of 1921: “Ellis Island Authorities Gently Lead Immigrants to Appreciation of Good Points of America by Introducing Them to the Pleasures of Ice Cream Sandwiches.” [link]

We all scream for ice cream

By 1943, American heavy-bomber crews figured out they could make ice cream over enemy territory by strapping buckets of mix to the rear gunner’s compartment before missions. By the time they landed, the custard would have frozen at altitude and been churned smooth by engine vibrations and turbulence—if not machine-gun fire and midair explosions.  [link]